University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Optical coherence tomography-based contact indentation for diaphragm mechanics in a mouse model of transforming growth factor alpha induced lung disease

Wang, K.C.W., Astell, C.J., Wijesinghe, P., Larcombe, A.N., Pinniger, G.J., Zosky, G.R., Kennedy, B.F., Berry, L.J., Sampson, David, James, A.L. , Le Cras, T.D. and Noble, P.B. (2017) Optical coherence tomography-based contact indentation for diaphragm mechanics in a mouse model of transforming growth factor alpha induced lung disease Scientific Reports, 7 (1).

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This study tested the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based indentation to assess mechanical properties of respiratory tissues in disease. Using OCT-based indentation, the elastic modulus of mouse diaphragm was measured from changes in diaphragm thickness in response to an applied force provided by an indenter. We used a transgenic mouse model of chronic lung disease induced by the overexpression of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), established by the presence of pleural and peribronchial fibrosis and impaired lung mechanics determined by the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography. Diaphragm elastic modulus assessed by OCT-based indentation was reduced by TGF-α at both left and right lateral locations (p < 0.05). Diaphragm elastic modulus at left and right lateral locations were correlated within mice (r = 0.67, p < 0.01) suggesting that measurements were representative of tissue beyond the indenter field. Co-localised images of diaphragm after TGF-α overexpression revealed a layered fibrotic appearance. Maximum diaphragm force in conventional organ bath studies was also reduced by TGF-α overexpression (p < 0.01). Results show that OCT-based indentation provided clear delineation of diseased diaphragm, and together with organ bath assessment, provides new evidence suggesting that TGF-α overexpression produces impairment in diaphragm function and, therefore, an increase in the work of breathing in chronic lung disease.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Wang, K.C.W.
Astell, C.J.
Wijesinghe, P.
Larcombe, A.N.
Pinniger, G.J.
Zosky, G.R.
Kennedy, B.F.
Berry, L.J.
Sampson, Davidd.sampson@surrey.ac.uk
James, A.L.
Le Cras, T.D.
Noble, P.B.
Date : 2017
Identification Number : 10.1038/s41598-017-01431-x
Depositing User : Maria Rodriguez-Marquez
Date Deposited : 04 Jun 2018 08:50
Last Modified : 19 Sep 2018 11:32
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/846728

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800