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Externally induced frontoparietal synchronization modulates network dynamics and enhances working memory performance

Violante, Ines R, Li, Lucia M, Carmichael, David W, Lorenz, Romy, Leech, Robert, Hampshire, Adam, Rothwell, John C and Sharp, David J (2017) Externally induced frontoparietal synchronization modulates network dynamics and enhances working memory performance eLife, 6, e22001. e22001-1.

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Abstract

Cognitive functions such as working memory (WM) are emergent properties of large-scale network interactions. Synchronisation of oscillatory activity might contribute to WM by enabling the coordination of long-range processes. However, causal evidence for the way oscillatory activity shapes network dynamics and behavior in humans is limited. Here we applied transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to exogenously modulate oscillatory activity in a right frontoparietal network that supports WM. Externally induced synchronization improved performance when cognitive demands were high. Simultaneously collected fMRI data reveals tACS effects dependent on the relative phase of the stimulation and the internal cognitive processing state. Specifically, synchronous tACS during the verbal WM task increased parietal activity, which correlated with behavioral performance. Furthermore, functional connectivity results indicate that the relative phase of frontoparietal stimulation influences information flow within the WM network. Overall, our findings demonstrate a link between behavioral performance in a demanding WM task and large-scale brain synchronization.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Violante, Ines Rines.violante@surrey.ac.uk
Li, Lucia M
Carmichael, David W
Lorenz, Romy
Leech, Robert
Hampshire, Adam
Rothwell, John C
Sharp, David J
Date : 14 March 2017
Identification Number : 10.7554/eLife.22001
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright Violante et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Supplementary files . Supplementary file 1. Summary tables of the results from fMRI whole-brain analysis for the statisti- cal maps shown in Figure 4 and Figure 5. For each cluster, the peak and five local maxima within the cluster are listed along with x-y-z locations in MNI space. R = right hemisphere; L = left hemisphere. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.22001.018
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 12 Apr 2018 05:58
Last Modified : 12 Apr 2018 08:05
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/846183

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