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Occupations, work characteristics and common mental disorder

Harris, Jenny, Stansfield, S A, Pike, C, McManus, S, Bebbington, P, Brugha, T, Hassiotis, A, Jenkins, R, Meltzer, H, Moran, P and Clark, C (2013) Occupations, work characteristics and common mental disorder PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, 43 (5). pp 961-973.

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Abstract

Background. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMDs) by occupation in a representative sample of the English adult population. Another aim was to examine whether the increased risk of CMD in some occupations could be explained by adverse work characteristics. Method. We derived a sample of 3425 working-age respondents from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007. Occupations were classified by Standard Occupational Classification group, and CMD measured by the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Job characteristics were measured by questionnaire, and tested as explanatory factors in associations of occupation and CMD. Results. After adjusting for age, gender, housing tenure and marital status, caring personal service occupations had the greatest risk of CMD compared with all occupations (odds ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.16–2.58). The prevalence of adverse psychosocial work characteristics did not follow the pattern of CMD by occupation. Work characteristics did not explain the increased risk of CMDs associated with working in personal service occupations. Contrary to our hypotheses, adding work characteristics individually to the association of occupation and CMD tended to increase rather than decrease the odds for CMD. Conclusions. As has been found by others, psychosocial work characteristics were associated with CMD. However, we found that in our English national dataset they could not explain the high rates of CMD in particular occupations. We suggest that selection into occupations may partly explain high CMD rates in certain occupations. Also, we did not measure emotional demands, and these may be important mediators of the relationship between occupation type and CMDs.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Harris, Jennyjen.harris@surrey.ac.uk
Stansfield, S A
Pike, C
McManus, S
Bebbington, P
Brugha, T
Hassiotis, A
Jenkins, R
Meltzer, H
Moran, P
Clark, C
Date : May 2013
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2012
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2018 16:04
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2018 16:04
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/846108

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