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Pathogenesis of bat rabies in a natural reservoir: comparative susceptibility of the straw-colored fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) to three strains of Lagos bat virus

Suu-Ire, R, Begeman, L, Banyard, A, Breed, A, Drosten, C, Eggerbauer, E, Freuling, C, Gibson, L, Goharriz, H, Horton, Daniel , Jennings, D, Kuzmin, I, Marston, D, Ntiamoa-Baidu, Y, Sbarbaro, S, Selden, D, Wise, E, Kuiken, T, Fooks, A, Müller, T, Wood, J and Cunningham, A (2018) Pathogenesis of bat rabies in a natural reservoir: comparative susceptibility of the straw-colored fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) to three strains of Lagos bat virus PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases., 12 (3), e0006311.

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Abstract

Rabies is a fatal neurologic disease caused by lyssavirus infection. People are infected through contact with infected animals. The relative increase of human rabies acquired from bats calls for a better understanding of lyssavirus infections in their natural hosts. So far, there is no experimental model that mimics natural lyssavirus infection in the reservoir bat species. Lagos bat virus is a lyssavirus that is endemic in straw-colored fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) in Africa. Here we compared the susceptibility of these bats to three strains of Lagos bat virus (from Senegal, Nigeria, and Ghana) by intracranial inoculation. To allow comparison between strains, we ensured the same titer of virus was inoculated in the same location of the brain of each bat. All bats (n = 3 per strain) were infected, and developed neurological signs, and fatal meningoencephalitis with lyssavirus antigen expression in neurons. There were three main differences among the groups. First, time to death was substantially shorter in the Senegal and Ghana groups (4 to 6 days) than in the Nigeria group (8 days). Second, each virus strain produced a distinct clinical syndrome. Third, the spread of virus to peripheral tissues, tested by hemi-nested reverse transcriptase PCR, was frequent (3 of 3 bats) and widespread (8 to 10 tissues positive of 11 tissues examined) in the Ghana group, was frequent and less widespread in the Senegal group (3/3 bats, 3 to 6 tissues positive), and was rare and restricted in the Nigeria group (1/3 bats, 2 tissues positive). Centrifugal spread of virus from brain to tissue of excretion in the oral cavity is required to enable lyssavirus transmission. Therefore, the Senegal and Ghana strains seem most suitable for further pathogenesis, and for transmission, studies in the straw-colored fruit bat.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Suu-Ire, R
Begeman, L
Banyard, A
Breed, A
Drosten, C
Eggerbauer, E
Freuling, C
Gibson, L
Goharriz, H
Horton, Danield.horton@surrey.ac.uk
Jennings, D
Kuzmin, I
Marston, D
Ntiamoa-Baidu, Y
Sbarbaro, S
Selden, D
Wise, E
Kuiken, T
Fooks, A
Müller, T
Wood, J
Cunningham, A
Date : 5 March 2018
Identification Number : 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006311
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2018 Suu-Ire et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 28 Feb 2018 16:09
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2018 15:05
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/845919

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