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Investigating the longitudinal association between diabetes and anxiety: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Smith, Kimberley, Deschênes, Sonya S. and Schmitz, Norbert (2018) Investigating the longitudinal association between diabetes and anxiety: a systematic review and meta-analysis Diabetic Medicine.

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Abstract

Objectives:

Previous research has indicated that there is an association between diabetes and anxiety. However, no synthesis has determined the direction of this association. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the longitudinal relationship between anxiety and diabetes.

Method:

We searched seven databases for studies examining the longitudinal relationship between anxiety and diabetes. Two independent reviewers screened studies from a population aged 16 or older that either a) examined anxiety as a risk factor for incident diabetes or b) examined diabetes as a risk factor for incident anxiety. Studies that met eligibility criteria were put forward for data extraction and meta-analysis.

Results:

In total 14 studies (n=1,760,800) that examined anxiety as a risk factor for incident diabetes and 2 studies (n=88,109) that examined diabetes as a risk factor for incident anxiety were eligible for inclusion in the review. Only studies examining anxiety as a risk factor for incident diabetes were put forward for the meta-analysis. The least adjusted (unadjusted or adjusted for age only) estimate indicated a significant association between baseline anxiety with incident diabetes (OR 1.47: 1.23-1.75). Furthermore, most-adjusted analyses indicated a significant association between baseline anxiety and incident diabetes. Included studies that examined diabetes to incident anxiety found no association.

Conclusions:

There was an association between baseline anxiety with incident diabetes. Results also indicate the need for more research to examine the direction of association from diabetes to incident anxiety. This work adds to the growing body of evidence that poor mental health increases the risk of developing diabetes.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Smith, Kimberleykimberley.j.smith@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Deschênes, Sonya S.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Schmitz, NorbertUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2018
Uncontrolled Keywords : Anxiety; Diabetes; Longitudinal; Meta-analysis; Systematic review
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 24 Jan 2018 11:33
Last Modified : 24 Jan 2018 11:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/845674

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