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Playing with class: Middle-class intensive mothering and the consumption of children's toys in Vietnam

Le-Phuong Nguyen, Khanh, Harman, Vicki and Cappellini, Benedetta (2017) Playing with class: Middle-class intensive mothering and the consumption of children's toys in Vietnam International Journal of Consumer Studies, 41 (5). pp. 449-456.

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Abstract

This article explores the way in which Vietnamese mothers purchase, gift and share toys with their children. The study utilises a qualitative design comprising semi-structured interviews with 10 Vietnamese middle-class professional working mothers of children aged between 5 and 9. This research highlights the way in which toys defined as “good” by mothers need to fulfil a number of important practical and social functions: they act as an investment in the child's future, as a reward, and as a means for mothers to buy time for themselves. The findings illustrate how these functions are influenced by Confucian and Western discourses of intensive mothering, generating a localized style of middle-class intensive mothering, characterized by what we have called the ideal of the triple excellent and intensive mother.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Department of Sociology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Le-Phuong Nguyen, Khanh
Harman, Vickiv.harman@surrey.ac.uk
Cappellini, Benedetta
Date : 31 March 2017
Identification Number : 10.1111/ijcs.12349
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Uncontrolled Keywords : Gender; Toys; Intensive mothering; Social class; Vietnam
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 21 Nov 2017 13:25
Last Modified : 15 Mar 2018 08:13
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/844969

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