University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

External validation of a collar-mounted triaxial accelerometer for second-by-second monitoring of eight behavioural states in dogs

den Uijl, Ingrid, Gomez Alvarez, Constanza, Bartram, David, Dror, Yoni, Holland, Robert and Cook, Alasdair (2017) External validation of a collar-mounted triaxial accelerometer for second-by-second monitoring of eight behavioural states in dogs PLoS ONE, 12 (11), e0188481.

[img]
Preview
Text
External validation of a collar-mounted triaxial accelerometer for second-by-second monitoring of eight behavioural states in dogs.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Early detection of disease by an animal owner may motivate them to seek early veterinary advice. Presentation before a more advanced clinical manifestation is evident could lead to more effective treatment and thus benefit the animal's health and welfare. Accelerometers are able to detect changes in specific activities or behaviours, thus indicating early signs of possible adverse health events. The objective of this validation study was to determine whether the detection of eight behavioural states: walk, trot, canter/gallop, sleep, static/inactive, eat, drink, and headshake, by an accelerometer device was sufficiently accurate to be useful in a clinical setting. This fully independent external validation estimated the accuracy of a specific triaxial, collar-mounted accelerometer on a second-by second basis in 51 healthy dogs of different breeds, aged between 6 months and 13 years, weighing >10 kg. The overall diagnostic effectiveness was estimated as:%record correctly classified of > 95% in walk, trot, canter/gallop, eat, drink and headshake and >90% in sleep and static/inactive. The positive predictive values ranged from 93±100%, while the negative predictive values ranged from 96±100%, with exception of static/inactive (86%).This was probably because dogs were placed in unfamiliar kennels where they did not exhibit their typical resting behaviour. The device is worn on a collar, making its use feasible for anyone wanting to monitor their dog's behaviour. The high accuracy in detecting various kinds of behaviour appears promising in assessing canine health and welfare states.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
den Uijl, Ingridi.denuijl@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Gomez Alvarez, Constanzac.gomezalvarez@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Bartram, DavidUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dror, YoniUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Holland, RobertUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cook, Alasdairalasdair.j.cook@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 29 November 2017
Identification Number : 10.1371/journal.pone.0188481
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2017 den Uijl et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Additional Information : Data Availability Statement: Data are available from doi:10.6084/m9.figshare.5594530.
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 20 Nov 2017 13:59
Last Modified : 13 Dec 2017 08:46
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/844954

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800