University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Fast chemical shift imaging by the echo planar imaging technique.

Newman, David Richard. (1998) Fast chemical shift imaging by the echo planar imaging technique. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

[img]
Preview
Text
10148629.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Phase-Encoded Pi Echo Planar Imaging (PEPI) may be used for the high-speed acquisition of spatial and spectroscopic data in samples where a distribution of chemically shifted sites is present. A pulse sequence has been developed using SMIS Limited MR3040 hardware and the Pulse Programming Language. In this thesis Chapter One describes the origins and principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments. Chapter Two describes the application of magnetic field gradients to produce images using pulse Fourier transform NMR. In Chapter Three the development of fast spectroscopic Echo Planar sequences is discussed, leading to a description of the PEPI sequence in Chapter Four. Included is a description of the special instrumentation needed to implement very fast spectroscopic imaging sequences and an analysis of some initial results which addresses issues particularly associated with these techniques. Some examples of applications to 1H studies of the human brain, where spectroscopic EPI presents a special advantage in terms of temporal resolution, and recommendations for future work are given in Chapter Five.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Newman, David Richard.
Date : 1998
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THS
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 09 Nov 2017 12:17
Last Modified : 20 Jun 2018 11:24
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/844147

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800