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Are the literacy difficulties that characterize developmental dyslexia associated with a failure to integrate letters and speech sounds?

Nash, HM, Gooch, Deborah, Hulme, C, Mahajan, Y, McArthur, G, Steinmetzger, K and Snowling, MJ (2016) Are the literacy difficulties that characterize developmental dyslexia associated with a failure to integrate letters and speech sounds? Developmental Science, 20 (4), e12423.

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Abstract

The ‘automatic letter-sound integration hypothesis’ (Blomert, 2011) proposes that dyslexia results from a failure to fullyintegrate letters and speech sounds into automated audio-visual objects. We tested this hypothesis in a sample of English-speaking children with dyslexic difficulties (N = 13) and samples of chronological-age-matched (CA; N = 17) and reading-age-matched controls (RA; N = 17) aged 7–13 years. Each child took part in two priming experiments in which speech soundswere preceded by congruent visual letters (congruent condition) or Greek letters (baseline). In a behavioural experiment,responses to speech sounds in the two conditions were compared using reaction times. These data revealed faster reaction timesin the congruent condition in all three groups. In a second electrophysiological experiment, responses to speech sounds in the two conditions were compared using event-related potentials (ERPs). These data revealed a significant effect of congruency on (1)the P1 ERP over left frontal electrodes in the CA group and over fronto-central electrodes in the dyslexic group and (2) the P2ERP in the dyslexic and RA control groups. These findings suggest that our sample of English-speaking children with dyslexic difficulties demonstrate a degree of letter-sound integration that is appropriate for their reading level, which challenges the letter-sound integration hypothesis.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Nash, HMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gooch, Deborahd.gooch@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Hulme, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mahajan, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
McArthur, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Steinmetzger, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Snowling, MJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 6 August 2016
Identification Number : 10.1111/desc.12423
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Science Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use,distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 19 Sep 2017 15:06
Last Modified : 19 Sep 2017 15:06
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/842329

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