University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

The association between diabetes, level of glycaemic control and eye infection: Cohort database study

Ansari, AS, de Lusignan, Simon, Hinton, William, Munro, N and Mcgovern, Andrew (2017) The association between diabetes, level of glycaemic control and eye infection: Cohort database study Primary Care Diabetes, 11 (5). pp. 421-429.

[img] Text
Finished publication Primary Care Diabetes. revised may 2017 (1) (1).docx - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 24 May 2018.

Download (145kB)

Abstract

Aim: To examine whether diabetes and the degree of glycaemic control is associated with an increased risk of acute eye infection, and prescribing of ocular antimicrobial agents. Design and setting: A retrospective cohort study was carried out using the Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre database (RCGP RSC), a large primary care database in the United Kingdom. We compared ocular infection rates in people aged ≥15 years without diabetes to those with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2. We developed logistic regression models to assess the excess risk in diabetes of: conjunctivitis, blepharitis, stye/chalzion, periorbital cellulitis, keratitis/keratoconjunctivitis, lacrimal gland infection, endopthalmitis, and ocular antimicrobial prescriptions over a six-year period (2010–2015). We also analysed the impact of glycaemic control on infection rates in those with diabetes. All models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results: We analysed infection risk in 889,856 people without diabetes and 48,584 people with diabetes (3273 type 1, and 45,311 type 2). After adjustment for confounders both type 1 and type 2 were associated with increased incidence of conjunctivitis (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.38–1.88; p < 0.0001 and OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.06–1.16; p < 0.0001 respectively). No association was found with blepharitis, stye/chalzion, periorbital cellulitis, keratitis/keratoconjunctivitis, lacrimal gland infection, and endopthalmitis in the whole population. In subgroup analyses blepharitis was more common in those with type 1 diabetes under 50 years old and endopthalmitis in those under 50 with type 2 diabetes. Glycaemic control was not found to be associated with any infection. Diabetes was also associated with an increased incidence of antimicrobial prescriptions (Type 1 OR 1.69; 95% CI 1.51–1.88; p < 0.0001 and type 2 OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.13–1.20; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Conjunctivitis is recorded more frequently in people with diabetes. However, no substantial increase in recording of other ocular infections was noted. Infection risk was not found to be associated with the degree of glycaemic control

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Ansari, ASs.ansari@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
de Lusignan, SimonS.Lusignan@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Hinton, Williamw.hinton@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Munro, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mcgovern, Andrewa.p.mcgovern@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 23 June 2017
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.pcd.2017.05.009
Copyright Disclaimer : 1751-9918/© 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Complications; Glycaemic control; Retinopath; Eye infections; Conjunctivitis; Blepharitis; Endopthalmitis; Periorbital cellulitis
Depositing User : Jane Hindle
Date Deposited : 18 Sep 2017 07:59
Last Modified : 02 Oct 2017 10:05
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/842286

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800