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The Role of Attachment in Body Weight and Weight Loss in Bariatric Patients

Nancarrow, Abigail, Hollywood, Amelia, Ogden, Jane and Hashemi, Majid (2017) The Role of Attachment in Body Weight and Weight Loss in Bariatric Patients Obesity Surgery.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore the role of attachment styles in obesity.

Material and Methods

The present study explored differences in insecure attachment styles between an obese sample waiting for bariatric surgery (n = 195) and an age, sex and height matched normal weight control group (n = 195). It then explored the role of attachment styles in predicting change in BMI 1 year post bariatric surgery (n = 143).

Results

The bariatric group reported significantly higher levels of anxious attachment and lower levels of avoidant attachment than the control non-obese group. Baseline attachment styles did not, however, predict change in BMI post surgery.

Conclusion

Attachment style is different in those that are already obese from those who are not. Attachment was not related to weight loss post surgery.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Nancarrow, AbigailUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hollywood, AmeliaUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ogden, JaneJ.Ogden@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Hashemi, MajidUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 6 July 2017
Identification Number : 10.1007/s11695-017-2796-1
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Author(s) 2017. This article is an open access publication. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons At tribution 4.0 International License (http:/ / creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Attachment; Obesity; Weight gain; Weight loss
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 14 Sep 2017 10:52
Last Modified : 14 Sep 2017 10:52
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/842270

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