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Routes to diagnosis for men with prostate cancer: men's cultural beliefs about how changes to their bodies and symptoms influence help-seeking actions. A narrative review of the literature

King-Okoye, Michelle, Arber, Anne and Faithfull, Sara (2017) Routes to diagnosis for men with prostate cancer: men's cultural beliefs about how changes to their bodies and symptoms influence help-seeking actions. A narrative review of the literature European Journal of Oncology Nursing (EJON), 30. pp. 48-58.

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Abstract

Purpose: To examine the findings of existing studies in relation to men's cultural beliefs about changes to their bodies relevant to prostate cancer and how these affect interpretation of bodily changes and helpseeking actions. Method: We undertook a narrative review of studies conducted from 2004 to 2017 in 6 databases that highlighted men's beliefs and help-seeking actions for bodily changes suggestive of prostate cancer. Results: Eighteen (18) studies reflecting men from various ethnicities and nationalities were included. The belief that blood and painful urination were warning signs to seek medical help delayed helpseeking among men compared to men that did not experience these symptoms. The belief that urinary symptoms such as dribbling, cystitis and urinary hesitancy were transient and related to ageing, normality and infection significantly delayed symptom appraisal and help-seeking. Men also held the belief that sexual changes, such as impotence and ejaculation dysfunction were private, embarrassing and a taboo. These beliefs impeded timely help-seeking. Cultural beliefs, spirituality and the role of wives/partners were significant for men to help appraise symptoms as requiring medical attention thus sanctioning the need for help-seeking. Conclusions: This review underscores a critical need for further empirical research into men's beliefs about bodily changes relevant to prostate health and how these beliefs affect their interpretation of symptoms and subsequent help-seeking actions.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
King-Okoye, Michellem.king-okoye@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Arber, AnneA.Arber@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Faithfull, SaraS.Faithfull@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 31 August 2017
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.ejon.2017.06.005
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Men; Prostate cancer; Beliefs; Appraisal; Help-seeking; Ethnicity; Culture
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 12 Sep 2017 16:36
Last Modified : 19 Sep 2017 07:44
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/842256

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