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Ethnicity Recording in Primary Care Computerised Medical Record Systems: An Ontological Approach

Tippu, Z, Correa, A, Liyanage, H, Burleigh, D, McGovern, A, Van Vlymen, J, Jones, S and de Lusignan, Simon (2017) Ethnicity Recording in Primary Care Computerised Medical Record Systems: An Ontological Approach Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics, 23 (4). pp. 799-806.

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Abstract

Background

Ethnicity recording within primary care computerised medical record (CMR) systems is suboptimal, exacerbated by tangled taxonomies within current coding systems.

Objective

To develop a method for extending ethnicity identification using routinely collected data.

Methods

We used an ontological method to maximise the reliability and prevalence of ethnicity information in the Royal College of General Practitioner’s Research and Surveillance database. Clinical codes were either directly mapped to ethnicity group or utilised as proxy markers (such as language spoken) from which ethnicity could be inferred. We compared the performance of our method with the recording rates that would be identified by code lists utilised by the UK pay for the performance system, with the help of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF).

Results

Data from 2,059,453 patients across 110 practices were included. The overall categorisable ethnicity using QOF codes was 36.26% (95% confidence interval (CI): 36.20%–36.33%). This rose to 48.57% (CI:48.50%–48.64%) using the described ethnicity mapping process. Mapping increased across all ethnic groups. The largest increase was seen in the white ethnicity category (30.61%; CI: 30.55%–30.67% to 40.24%; CI: 40.17%–40.30%). The highest relative increase was in the ethnic group categorised as the other (0.04%; CI: 0.03%–0.04% to 0.92%; CI: 0.91%–0.93%).

Conclusions

This mapping method substantially increases the prevalence of known ethnicity in CMR data and may aid future epidemiological research based on routine data.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Tippu, Z
Correa, A
Liyanage, H
Burleigh, D
McGovern, A
Van Vlymen, J
Jones, S
de Lusignan, SimonS.Lusignan@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 2017
Identification Number : 10.14236/jhi.v23i4.920
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT under Creative Commons license http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/. This is an open access journal, which means that all content is freely available without charge to the user or their institution. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles in this journal starting from Volume 21 without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author. This is in accordance with the BOAI definition of open access. For permission regarding papers published in previous volumes, please contact us.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Epidemiology; Ethnic Group; Primary Health Care
Depositing User : Jane Hindle
Date Deposited : 12 Sep 2017 14:34
Last Modified : 10 Jan 2018 14:19
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/842249

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