University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Association between glycaemic control and common infections in people with Type 2 diabetes: a cohort study

Hine, JL, de Lusignan, Simon, Burleigh, D, Pathirannehelage, S, McGovern, A, Gatenby, P, Jones, S, Jiang, D, Williams, J, Elliot, AJ , Smith, GE, Brownrigg, J, Hinchliffe, R and Munro, N (2016) Association between glycaemic control and common infections in people with Type 2 diabetes: a cohort study Diabetic Medicine, 34 (4). pp. 551-557.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Aim To investigate the impact of glycaemic control on infection incidence in people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods We compared infection rates during 2014 in people with Type 2 diabetes and people without diabetes in a large primary care cohort in the UK (the Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre database). We performed multilevel logistic regression to investigate the impact of Type 2 diabetes on presentation with infection, and the effect of glycaemic control on presentation with upper respiratory tract infections, bronchitis, influenza-like illness, pneumonia, intestinal infectious diseases, herpes simplex, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections, and genital and perineal infections. People with Type 2 diabetes were stratified by good [HbA1c < 53 mmol/mol (< 7%)], moderate [HbA1c 53–69 mmol/mol (7–8.5%)] and poor [HbA1c > 69 mmol/mol (> 8.5%)] glycaemic control using their most recent HbA1c concentration. Infection incidence was adjusted for important sociodemographic factors and patient comorbidities. Results We identified 34 278 people with Type 2 diabetes and 613 052 people without diabetes for comparison. The incidence of infections was higher in people with Type 2 diabetes for all infections except herpes simplex. Worsening glycaemic control was associated with increased incidence of bronchitis, pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections, and genital and perineal infections, but not with upper respiratory tract infections, influenza-like illness, intestinal infectious diseases or herpes simplex. Conclusions Almost all infections analysed were more common in people with Type 2 diabetes. Infections that are most commonly of bacterial, fungal or yeast origin were more frequent in people with worse glycaemic control.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Hine, JL
de Lusignan, SimonS.Lusignan@surrey.ac.uk
Burleigh, D
Pathirannehelage, S
McGovern, A
Gatenby, P
Jones, S
Jiang, D
Williams, J
Elliot, AJ
Smith, GE
Brownrigg, J
Hinchliffe, R
Munro, N
Date : 22 September 2016
Identification Number : 10.1111/dme.13205
Copyright Disclaimer : This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Diabet. Med. 34, 551–557 (2017), which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dme.13205/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Depositing User : Jane Hindle
Date Deposited : 12 Sep 2017 13:55
Last Modified : 03 May 2018 12:37
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/842247

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800