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A longitudinal study of the impact of occupational mobility on job satisfaction trajectory: Individual differences in neuroticism.

Zhou, Ying, Wu, CH, Zou, M and Williams, Mark (2017) A longitudinal study of the impact of occupational mobility on job satisfaction trajectory: Individual differences in neuroticism. Best Paper Proceedings of the Seventy-seventh Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. (nominated for AOM Careers Division’s “Overall Best Paper” award), 15471.

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Abstract

Previous research on job change has identified a common pattern of job satisfaction trajectory during the turnover process. Individuals often experience a sharp increase in job satisfaction upon initial entry into the new job which gradually returns to baseline levels over time. This study examines how this ‘honeymoon-hangover’ pattern is affected by the nature of the job change and the individual’s personality. Drawing on the longitudinal data provided by the British Household Panel Survey which followed approximately 10,000 individuals annually for eighteen years, this study shows that only those who successfully move up the occupational ladder experience significant ‘honeymoon’ effects. By contrast, individuals who make lateral or downward career transitions experience no significant honeymoon effects but dissatisfaction that lasts for years after the transition. However, the pattern varies depending on the individual’s level of neuroticism. Compared to emotionally stable individuals, those with high levels of neuroticism react more strongly to both upward and downward occupational mobility, with the job satisfaction gap between the two groups growing wider over time. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account both situational and dispositional factors for understanding individuals’ reactions to career change.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Surrey Business School
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Zhou, YingYing.Zhou@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Wu, CHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zou, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Williams, Markm.t.williams@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : August 2017
Identification Number : 10.5465/AMBPP.2017.183
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2017 Academy of Management. This is the author's accepted manuscript.
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/EDTAtinc, GucluUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Nominated for the Careers Division’s “Overall Best Paper” award 2017
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 04 Aug 2017 09:58
Last Modified : 05 Oct 2017 11:40
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/841845

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