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Illness perception, self-care behaviour and quality of life of heart failure patients: A longitudinal questionnaire survey

Goodman, Helen, Firouzi, Ashi, Banya, Winston, Lau-Walker, Margaret and Cowie, Martin R. (2013) Illness perception, self-care behaviour and quality of life of heart failure patients: A longitudinal questionnaire survey International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50 (7). pp. 945-953.

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Abstract

Objectives To examine the associations between illness perception, self-care behaviour, and quality of life in patients admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of heart failure (HF), and the changes in these at 2 and 6 months after discharge. Design Longitudinal questionnaire-based study. Setting Three London hospitals with specialist heart failure services. Participants A convenience sample of 88 patients (70% male, mean age 70) admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of heart failure were recruited prior to discharge. Participants were over the age of 18, able to understand English, and with the cognitive ability to complete the questionnaires. Thirty-eight patients did not provide follow-up data: 21 (24%) died during the 6-month follow-up period, and 17 (19%) did not return their post-discharge questionnaires. Methods The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Self-Care Heart Failure Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure (MLHF) Questionnaires were completed prior to discharge from hospital, and 2 and 6 months after discharge. Results HF symptoms improved over time (MLHF score co-efficient [95%CI] −0.915 [−1.581, −0.250], P < 0.001). Patients appeared to believe that many of the causes of their illness were outside their control. Although self-care maintenance (e.g. weighing daily) improved over time, this did not translate into increased involvement in self-care management (e.g. adjusting diuretic dose) or the ability to act on changes in symptoms. Self-care confidence was lower in those who reported a more negative emotional impact of their illness, but was higher in those who had high scores on illness coherence. Conclusions Six months following hospital discharge, patients’ symptom control had improved. Many continued to believe that their illness was outside their control, and although self-care maintenance improved this was not associated with greater self-care management, particularly if the patient's emotional state was negative, and their understanding of their condition was poor. Our data suggest that a more participative person-centred approach, tailoring the disease management programme to address the patient's illness beliefs and emotional state, assisting the individual to identify barriers and solutions, may help increase self-care confidence and management.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Goodman, HelenUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Firouzi, AshiUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Banya, WinstonUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lau-Walker, Margaretm.lau-walker@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Cowie, Martin R.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : July 2013
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.11.007
Copyright Disclaimer : �© 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Heart failure; Quality of life; Illness perception; Self-care; Disease management
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 17 Jul 2017 10:10
Last Modified : 17 Jul 2017 10:10
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/841662

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