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Development of a two-dimensional model for predicting transdermal permeation with the follicular pathway: Demonstration with a caffeine study

Kattou, Panayiotis, Lian, Guoping, Glavin, S, Sorrell, I and Chen, Tao (2017) Development of a two-dimensional model for predicting transdermal permeation with the follicular pathway: Demonstration with a caffeine study Pharmaceutical Research, 34 (10). pp. 2036-2048.

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Abstract

Purpose: The development of a new two-dimensional (2D) model to predict follicular permeation, with integration into a recently reported multi-scale model of transdermal permeation is presented. Methods: The follicular pathway is modelled by diffusion in sebum. The mass transfer and partition properties of solutes in lipid, corneocytes, viable dermis, dermis and systemic circulation are calculated as reported previously [Pharm Res 33 (2016) 1602]. The mass transfer and partition properties in sebum are collected from existing literature. None of the model input parameters was fit to the clinical data with which the model prediction is compared. Results: The integrated model has been applied to predict the published clinical data of transdermal permeation of caffeine. The relative importance of the follicular pathway is analysed. Good agreement of the model prediction with the clinical data has been obtained. The simulation confirms that for caffeine the follicular route is important; the maximum bioavailable concentration of caffeine in systemic circulation with open hair follicles is predicted to be 20% higher than that when hair follicles are blocked. Conclusions: The follicular pathway contributes to not only short time fast penetration, but also the overall systemic bioavailability. With such in silico model, useful information can be obtained for caffeine disposition and localised delivery in lipid, corneocytes, viable dermis, dermis and the hair follicle. Such detailed information is difficult to obtain experimentally.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Chemical and Process Engineering
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Kattou, Panayiotisp.kattou@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Lian, Guopingg.lian@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Glavin, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sorrell, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Chen, TaoT.Chen@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 June 2017
Identification Number : 10.1007/s11095-017-2209-0
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Diffusion, In silico modelling, pharmacokinetic model, transdermal drug delivery, bioavailability.
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 13 Jun 2017 10:44
Last Modified : 28 Sep 2017 13:10
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/841363

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