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Linking CHHiP prostate cancer RCT with GP records: A study proposal to investigate the effect of co-morbidities and medications on long-term symptoms and radiotherapy-related toxicity

Lemanska, Agnieszka, Byford, RC, Correa, Ana, Cruickshank, C, Dearnaley, DP, Griffin, C, Hall, E, de Lusignan, Simon and Faithfull, Sara (2017) Linking CHHiP prostate cancer RCT with GP records: A study proposal to investigate the effect of co-morbidities and medications on long-term symptoms and radiotherapy-related toxicity Technical Innovations & Patient Support in Radiation Oncology.

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Abstract

Background: Patients receiving cancer treatment often have one or more co-morbid conditions that are treated pharmacologically. Co-morbidities are recorded in clinical trials usually only at baseline. However, co-morbidities evolve and new ones emerge during cancer treatment. The interaction between multi-morbidity and cancer recovery is significant but poorly understood. Purpose: To investigate the effect of co-morbidities (e.g. cardiovascular and diabetes) and medications (e.g. statins, antihypertensives, metformin) on radiotherapy-related toxicity and long-term symptoms in order to identify potential risk factors. The possible protective effect of medications such as statins or antihypertensives in reducing radiotherapy-related toxicity will also be explored. Methods: Two datasets will be linked. 1) CHHiP (Conventional or Hypofractionated High Dose Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer) randomised control trial. CHHiP contains pelvic symptoms and radiation-related toxicity reported by patients and clinicians. 2) GP (General Practice) data from RCGP RSC (Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre). The GP records of CHHiP patients will be extracted, including cardiovascular co-morbidities, diabetes and prescription medications. Statistical analysis of the combined dataset will be performed in order to investigate the effect. Conclusions: Linking two sources of healthcare data is an exciting area of big healthcare data research. With limited data in clinical trials (not all clinical trials collect information on co-morbidities or medications) and limited lengths of follow-up, linking different sources of information is increasingly needed to investigate long-term outcomes. With increasing pressures to collect detailed information in clinical trials (e.g. co-morbidities, medications), linkage to routinely collected data offers the potential to support efficient conduct of clinical trials.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Lemanska, Agnieszkaa.lemanska@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Byford, RCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Correa, Anaa.correa@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Cruickshank, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dearnaley, DPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Griffin, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hall, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
de Lusignan, SimonS.Lusignan@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Faithfull, SaraS.Faithfull@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 7 September 2017
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2017 The Author(s). This article is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)license.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Data linkage, Radiotherapy-related side-effects, Late-effects, CHHiP, RCGP RSC, Big data
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 07 Jun 2017 15:20
Last Modified : 07 Jun 2017 15:38
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/841334

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