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Association between maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy and neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood; results from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

Darling, Andrea, Rayman, Margaret, Steer, Colin D., Golding, Jean and Lanham-New, Susan (2017) Association between maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy and neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood; results from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children British Journal of Nutrition, 117 (12). pp. 1682-1692.

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Abstract

Seafood intake in pregnancy has been positively associated with childhood cognitive outcomes which could potentially relate to the high vitamin-D content of oily fish. However, whether higher maternal vitamin D status [serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D, 25(OH)D] in pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk of offspring suboptimal neurodevelopmental outcomes is unclear. A total of 7065 mother-child pairs were studied from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort who had data for both serum total 25(OH)D concentration in pregnancy and at least one measure of offspring neurodevelopment (pre-school development at 6–42 months; “Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire” scores at 7 years; IQ at 8 years; reading ability at 9 years). After adjustment for confounders, children of vitamin-D deficient mothers (< 50.0 nmol/L) were more likely to have scores in the lowest quartile for gross motor development at 30 months (OR 1.20 95% CI 1.03, 1.40), fine motor development at 30 months (OR 1.23 95% CI 1.05, 1.44), and social development at 42 months (OR 1.20 95% CI 1.01, 1.41) than vitamin-D sufficient mothers (≥ 50.0 nmol/L). No associations were found with neurodevelopmental outcomes, including IQ, measured at older ages. However, our results suggest that deficient maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy may have adverse effects on some measures of motor and social development in children under 4 years. Prevention of vitamin D deficiency may be important for preventing suboptimal development in the first 4 years of life.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Darling, AndreaA.L.Darling@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Rayman, MargaretM.Rayman@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Steer, Colin D.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Golding, JeanUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lanham-New, SusanS.Lanham-New@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 12 July 2017
Funders : Medical Research Council (MRC)
Identification Number : 10.1017/S0007114517001398
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Authors 2017
Uncontrolled Keywords : Prenatal vitamin D; 25–hydroxy–vitamin D; Motor development; Social development; IQ and reading ability; ALSPAC
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 07 Jun 2017 13:08
Last Modified : 16 Aug 2017 13:00
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/841330

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