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Design and validation of realistic breast models for use in multiple alternative forced choice virtual clinical trials

Elangovan, P, Mackenzie, A, Dance, DR, Young, KC, Cooke, V, Wilkinson, L, Given-Wilson, RM, Wallis, MG and Wells, K (2017) Design and validation of realistic breast models for use in multiple alternative forced choice virtual clinical trials PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, 62 (7). pp. 2778-2794.

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Abstract

A novel method has been developed for generating quasi-realistic voxel phantoms which simulate the compressed breast in mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The models are suitable for use in virtual clinical trials requiring realistic anatomy which use the multiple alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm and patches from the complete breast image. The breast models are produced by extracting features of breast tissue components from DBT clinical images including skin, adipose and fibro-glandular tissue, blood vessels and Cooper’s ligaments. A range of different breast models can then be generated by combining these components. Visual realism was validated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study of patches from simulated images calculated using the breast models and from real patient images. Quantitative analysis was undertaken using fractal dimension and power spectrum analysis. The average areas under the ROC curves for 2D and DBT images were 0.51 ± 0.06 and 0.54 ± 0.09 demonstrating that simulated and real images were statistically indistinguishable by expert breast readers (7 observers); errors represented as one standard error of the mean. The average fractal dimensions (2D, DBT) for real and simulated images were (2.72 ± 0.01, 2.75 ± 0.01) and (2.77 ± 0.03, 2.82 ± 0.04) respectively; errors represented as one standard error of the mean. Excellent agreement was found between power spectrum curves of real and simulated images, with average β values (2D, DBT) of (3.10 ± 0.17, 3.21 ± 0.11) and (3.01 ± 0.32, 3.19 ± 0.07) respectively; errors represented as one standard error of the mean. These results demonstrate that radiological images of these breast models realistically represent the complexity of real breast structures and can be used to simulate patches from mammograms and DBT images that are indistinguishable from patches from the corresponding real breast images. The method can generate about 500 radiological patches (~30mm × 30mm) per day for AFC experiments on a single workstation. This is the first study to quantitatively validate the realism of simulated radiological breast images using direct blinded comparison with real data via the ROC paradigm with expert breast readers

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Electronic Engineering
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering > Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Elangovan, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mackenzie, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dance, DRd.r.dance@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Young, KCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cooke, VUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wilkinson, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Given-Wilson, RMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wallis, MGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wells, Kk.wells@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 14 March 2017
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6560/aa622c
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2017 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords : virtual clinical trials, breast model, breast phantom, synthetic breast, image simulation, 2D-mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 13:58
Last Modified : 23 May 2017 12:22
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/841038

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