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Optimizing trauma system design: the GEOS (Geospatial Evaluation of Systems of Trauma Care) approach.

Jansen, JO, Morrison, JJ, Wang, H, Lawrenson, R, Egan, G, He, S and Campbell, MK (2014) Optimizing trauma system design: the GEOS (Geospatial Evaluation of Systems of Trauma Care) approach. J Trauma Acute Care Surg, 76 (4). pp. 1035-1040.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Trauma systems have been shown to reduce death and disability from injury but must be appropriately configured. A systematic approach to trauma system design can help maximize geospatial effectiveness and reassure stakeholders that the best configuration has been chosen. METHODS: This article describes the GEOS [Geospatial Evaluation of Systems of Trauma Care] methodology, a mathematical modeling of a population-based data set, which aims to derive geospatially optimized trauma system configurations for a geographically defined setting. GEOS considers a region's spatial injury profile and the available resources and uses a combination of travel time analysis and multiobjective optimization. The methodology is described in general and with regard to its application to our case study of Scotland. RESULTS: The primary outcome will be trauma system configuration. CONCLUSION: GEOS will contribute to the design of a trauma system for Scotland. The methodology is flexible and inherently transferable to other settings and could also be used to provide assurance that the configuration of existing trauma systems is fit for purpose.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Jansen, JOUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morrison, JJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wang, Hhanding.wang@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Lawrenson, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Egan, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
He, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Campbell, MKUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : April 2014
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000196
Uncontrolled Keywords : Delivery of Health Care, Efficiency, Organizational, Humans, Scotland, Trauma Centers, Traumatology
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 13:38
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 15:12
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/839956

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