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Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics.

Song, JH, Murphy, RJ, Narayan, R and Davies, GB (2009) Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, 364 (1526). pp. 2127-2139.

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Abstract

Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all 'good' or petrochemical-based products are all 'bad'. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated 'home' composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Song, JHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Murphy, RJrj.murphy@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Narayan, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Davies, GBUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 27 July 2009
Identification Number : 10.1098/rstb.2008.0289
Uncontrolled Keywords : Biodegradation, Environmental, Biopolymers, Conservation of Natural Resources, Environment, Plastics, Product Packaging, Waste Management
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 13:02
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 15:07
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/837662

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