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Very massive runaway stars from three-body encounters

Gvaramadze, VV and Gualandris, A (2010) Very massive runaway stars from three-body encounters Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

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Abstract

Very massive stars preferentially reside in the cores of their parent clusters and form binary or multiple systems. We study the role of tight very massive binaries in the origin of the field population of very massive stars. We performed numerical simulations of dynamical encounters between single (massive) stars and a very massive binary with parameters similar to those of the most massive known Galactic binaries, WR 20a and NGC 3603-A1. We found that these three-body encounters could be responsible for the origin of high peculiar velocities ($\geq$ 70 km/s) observed for some very massive ($\geq$ 60-70 Msun) runaway stars in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud (e.g., $\lambda$ Cep, BD+43 3654, Sk-67 22, BI 237, 30 Dor 016), which can hardly be explained within the framework of the binary-supernova scenario. The production of high-velocity massive stars via three-body encounters is accompanied by the recoil of the binary in the opposite direction to the ejected star. We show that the relative position of the very massive binary R145 and the runaway early B-type star Sk-69 206 on the sky is consistent with the possibility that both objects were ejected from the central cluster, R136, of the star-forming region 30 Doradus via the same dynamical event -- a three-body encounter.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Gvaramadze, VVUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gualandris, Aa.gualandris@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 July 2010
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 13:00
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 15:07
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/837571

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