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Reduction of the Internal Resistance of Carbon Electrodes for an Electric Double-layer Capacitor (EDLC)

Lei, C, Markoulidis, F, Ashitaka, Z and Lekakou, C (2012) Reduction of the Internal Resistance of Carbon Electrodes for an Electric Double-layer Capacitor (EDLC) In: The First International Conference on Materials, Energy and Environments (ICMEE), 2012-05-09 - 2012-05-11, Toledo, OH, USA.

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Abstract

Carbonaceous materials are commonly used to fabricate electrodes for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) or supercapacitors. The internal resistance of the carbon electrode comes from the carbon material itself, carbon particle-particle contact, and carbon-current collector contact. The high internal resistance of the carbon electrode can decrease capacitor energy and power performance, and reduce the lifetime of the capacitor. In this report, the sources of carbon based EDLC internal resistance were explored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A generalized equivalent circuit model was coupled with the EIS for the analyses. The EDLC cells were made from symmetric carbon/Al electrodes and operated in organic electrolyte. The analysis results showed the effects of the current collector, amount of polymer binder Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and carbon particle sizes on the internal resistance of the electrode.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (UNSPECIFIED)
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Lei, Cc.lei@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Markoulidis, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ashitaka, ZUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lekakou, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 9 May 2012
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 12:34
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 12:34
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/835882

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