University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Masculine Self-Presentation and Distancing from Femininity in Gay Men: An Experimental Examination of the Role of Masculinity Threat

Hunt, CJ, Fasoli, F, Carnaghi, A and Cadinu, M (2016) Masculine Self-Presentation and Distancing from Femininity in Gay Men: An Experimental Examination of the Role of Masculinity Threat Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 17 (1). pp. 108-112.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

There is evidence that discrimination directed toward gay men from some heterosexual men is partially driven by heterosexual men attempting to distance themselves from gay men’s perceived femininity. There is also evidence that many gay men wish they were more masculine than they currently are and will distance themselves from other gay men perceived as being feminine. This persisting stereotype that gay men are insufficiently masculine was theorized to lead gay men to be vulnerable to threats to their masculinity so that they would react to such threats by distancing themselves from feminine-stereotyped gay men and by attempting to present themselves as more masculine. The current study subjected 58 Italian gay men (mean age of 29.10 years, SD = 8.25) to either a threat or an affirmation of their masculinity, and observed reactions to vignettes describing masculine- and feminine-stereotyped gay men. It was hypothesized that those subjected to a threat to their masculinity would report less liking for, less comfort with, and less desire to interact with feminine gay men, while reporting greater similarity to masculine gay men. These hypotheses were partially supported: participants who were threatened in their masculinity reported being more similar to masculine gay men (η² = .09), and showed less interest in interacting with feminine gay men (η2 = .09) than participants whose masculinity was affirmed. These findings suggest that, despite the fact that they are often stereotyped as feminine, gay men may still feel pressure to conform to masculine role norms.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Hunt, CJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Fasoli, Ff.fasoli@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Carnaghi, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cadinu, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : January 2016
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 APA, all rights reserved
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:47
Last Modified : 18 May 2017 12:44
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/829255

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800