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POOR VITAMIN D STATUS IS ASSOCIATED WITH A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON MUSCULOSKELETAL HEALTH: RESULTS OF THE D-FINES STUDY

Darling, AL, Lee, PA, Hanjra, FK, Osborn, A, Patel, S, Duckworth, A, Cardew, P, Gray, R, Berry, JL and Lanham-New, SA (2009) POOR VITAMIN D STATUS IS ASSOCIATED WITH A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON MUSCULOSKELETAL HEALTH: RESULTS OF THE D-FINES STUDY .

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Abstract

There is a considerable lack of data examining poor vitamin D status on bone health and muscle function in different UK ethnic groups. The D-FINES study examined 373 Surrey-dwelling Caucasian (C) and Asian (A) women in four seasons of the year for diet, sunlight exposure, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and grip strength (GS). In the autumn season, lumbar spine bone mineral density (LSBMD) was also measured. The aim of this work was to examine differences in LSBMD and GS in A and C pre and postmenopausal women according to 25(OH)D. When women were grouped by 25(OH)D (<30 nmol/l, 30-39nmol/l; 40-74nmol/l; 75nmol/l+), ANCOVA adjusting for BMI showed a significant difference in LS BMD between the groups for summer (p=0.042), autumn (p=0.002) winter (p=0.028) and spring (p=0.019) 25(OH)D. The 25(OH)D <30nmol/l and 30-39nmol/l groups had significantly lower LS BMD than those with >75nmol/l. For GS, controlling for lean arm mass, a statistically significant difference between the four ethnic/menopausal groups (F=24.851, p<0.001) was found but no significant within subjects effect of season (F= 0.503, p=0.681) and no significant interaction between season and ethnic/menopausal group (F=0.303, p=0.974). Significant positive partial correlations were found for all women (p<0.001) in all seasons between 25(OH)D and GS. For all C as one group, significant positive correlations were found between 25(OH)D and GS in summer (r=0.307), autumn (r=0.223), winter (r=0.222) and spring (r=0.242), with p<0.001 for all seasons. However, this was not found for the A groups combined, or for the four groups separately (p>0.05). Overall, LS BMD was significantly higher in individuals with 25(OH)D >75nmol/l compared to those with <39nmol/l. These findings suggest poor 25(OH)D may be detrimental to bone health, which could potentially translate into increased fracture risk long-term. Also, 25(OH)D was positively correlated with GS in all women in all seasons, indicating low 25(OH)D may decrease GS, most likely via poorer muscle function. These findings are a cause for public health concern. This work was funded by the UK Foods Standards Agency (NO5064)

Item Type: Other
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Darling, ALUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lee, PAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hanjra, FKUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Osborn, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Patel, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Duckworth, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cardew, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gray, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Berry, JLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lanham-New, SAs.lanham-new@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2009
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:36
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:51
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/828452

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