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Brain responses and looking behavior during audiovisual speech integration in infants predict auditory speech comprehension in the second year of life.

Kushnerenko, E, Tomalski, P, Ballieux, H, Potton, A, Birtles, D, Frostick, C and Moore, DG (2013) Brain responses and looking behavior during audiovisual speech integration in infants predict auditory speech comprehension in the second year of life. Front Psychol, 4.

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Abstract

The use of visual cues during the processing of audiovisual (AV) speech is known to be less efficient in children and adults with language difficulties and difficulties are known to be more prevalent in children from low-income populations. In the present study, we followed an economically diverse group of thirty-seven infants longitudinally from 6-9 months to 14-16 months of age. We used eye-tracking to examine whether individual differences in visual attention during AV processing of speech in 6-9 month old infants, particularly when processing congruent and incongruent auditory and visual speech cues, might be indicative of their later language development. Twenty-two of these 6-9 month old infants also participated in an event-related potential (ERP) AV task within the same experimental session. Language development was then followed-up at the age of 14-16 months, using two measures of language development, the Preschool Language Scale and the Oxford Communicative Development Inventory. The results show that those infants who were less efficient in auditory speech processing at the age of 6-9 months had lower receptive language scores at 14-16 months. A correlational analysis revealed that the pattern of face scanning and ERP responses to audiovisually incongruent stimuli at 6-9 months were both significantly associated with language development at 14-16 months. These findings add to the understanding of individual differences in neural signatures of AV processing and associated looking behavior in infants.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Kushnerenko, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Tomalski, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ballieux, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Potton, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Birtles, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Frostick, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Moore, DGd.g.moore@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2013
Identification Number : 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00432
Uncontrolled Keywords : ERPs, audiovisual speech integration, eye-tracking, infants’ brain responses, language development, mismatch
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:30
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:50
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/828092

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