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Hypoxia inducible factor-1 and facilitative glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3: putative molecular components of the oxygen and glucose sensing apparatus in articular chondrocytes.

Mobasheri, A, Richardson, S, Mobasheri, R, Shakibaei, M and Hoyland, JA (2005) Hypoxia inducible factor-1 and facilitative glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3: putative molecular components of the oxygen and glucose sensing apparatus in articular chondrocytes. Histol Histopathol, 20 (4). pp. 1327-1338.

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Abstract

Articular cartilage is an avascular connective tissue in which the availability of oxygen and glucose is significantly lower than synovial fluid and plasma. Glucose is an important metabolic fuel and structural precursor that plays a key role in the synthesis of extracellular matrix macromolecules in articular cartilage. However, glucose concentrations in cartilage can fluctuate depending on age, physical activity and endocrine status. Chondrocytes are glycolytic cells and must be able to sense the quantities of oxygen and glucose available to them in the extracellular matrix and respond appropriately by adjusting cellular metabolism. Consequently chondrocytes must have the capacity to survive in an extracellular matrix with limited nutrients and low oxygen tensions. The molecular mechanisms responsible for allowing chondrocytes to adapt to these harsh environmental conditions are poorly understood. In this article we present a novel "dual" model of oxygen and glucose sensing in chondrocytes based on recent experimental data. This model incorporates the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1alpha) as an oxygen sensor and the hypoxia responsive facilitative glucose transporters, GLUT1 and GLUT3 as putative components of the glucose sensing apparatus in chondrocytes. Recent studies have shown that GLUT1 and GLUT3 are both expressed in chondrocytes and their HIF-1alpha-mediated transcription may be dually stimulated in response to hypoxia and low glucose conditions which in turn promote anaerobic glycolysis in favor of oxidative phosphorylation. This working model provides, for the first time, a unifying hypothesis to explain how chondrocytes might sense and respond to low oxygen tensions and alterations in extracellular glucose.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Mobasheri, Aa.mobasheri@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Richardson, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mobasheri, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Shakibaei, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hoyland, JAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : October 2005
Uncontrolled Keywords : Animals, Cartilage, Articular, Chondrocytes, Glucose, Glucose Transporter Type 1, Glucose Transporter Type 3, Humans, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, Models, Chemical, Oxygen
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:16
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:48
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/827113

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