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Case report of a possible familial predisposition to metabolic bone disease in juvenile rhesus macaques.

Wolfensohn, SE (2003) Case report of a possible familial predisposition to metabolic bone disease in juvenile rhesus macaques. Lab Anim, 37 (2). pp. 139-144.

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Abstract

Deficiencies of dietary calcium and/or vitamin D will cause hypocalcaemia, leading to metabolic bone disease. The disease commonly affects young rapidly growing animals and this is a report of the condition in a colony of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). A clinical problem of metabolic bone disease was seen in 1993, when it was treated and resolved satisfactorily. However it recurred in 1999 following changes in management and husbandry of the colony, at which time the clinical manifestations were more serious. The animals had bowed tibia, fibula, radius and ulna and enlarged epiphyses, were reluctant to climb and jump, had a 'hopping' gait and poor growth. The syndrome had a multifactorial aetiology involving a combination of staff and management changes, a borderline nutritional deficit, a lack of daylight for production of vitamin D, and a possible familial predisposition.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Wolfensohn, SEs.wolfensohn@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : April 2003
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1258/00236770360563787
Uncontrolled Keywords : Animal Husbandry, Animals, Bone Diseases, Metabolic, Bone and Bones, Female, Food, Formulated, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Macaca mulatta, Male, Pedigree, Sunlight, Vitamin D Deficiency
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:14
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:48
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/826961

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