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Glucose transporters in the intervertebral disc

Mobasheri, A, Bondy, CA, Moley, K, Mendes, AF, Rosa, SC, Richardson, SM, Hoyland, JA, Barrett-Jolley, R and Shakibaei, M (2008) Glucose transporters in the intervertebral disc Advances in Anatomy Embryology and Cell Biology, 200. pp. 53-57.

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Abstract

The intervertebral disc is a cartilaginous structure that resembles articular cartilage in its biochemistry and cell biology, but morphologically it is clearly different (Roberts 2002; Urban and Roberts 2003). The disc shows degenerative and ageing changes earlier than any other connective tissue in the human body (Urban and Roberts 2003). The maintenance of the ECM in the NP of the adult human disc is dependent on the functional integrity of the cartilage end plate cells (Pritzker 1977). Cartilage end plate senescence is followed by compensatory cartilaginous metaplasia of annulus fibrosus cells. It has been proposed that intervertebral disc narrowing and collapse are related to metabolic failure of matrix production by end plate and annulus fibrosus cells (Pritzker 1977). © 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Mobasheri, Aa.mobasheri@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Bondy, CAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Moley, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mendes, AFUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rosa, SCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Richardson, SMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hoyland, JAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Barrett-Jolley, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Shakibaei, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 10 September 2008
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-78899-7_9
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:12
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:48
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/826848

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