University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Simplified strategy for detection of recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group M isolates by gag/env heteroduplex mobility assay. Study Group on Heterogeneity of HIV Epidemics in African Cities.

Heyndrickx, L, Janssens, W, Zekeng, L, Musonda, R, Anagonou, S, Van der Auwera, G, Coppens, S, Vereecken, K, De Witte, K, Van Rampelbergh, R, Kahindo, M, Morison, L, McCutchan, FE, Carr, JK, Albert, J, Essex, M, Goudsmit, J, Asjö, B, Salminen, M, Buvé, A and van Der Groen, G (2000) Simplified strategy for detection of recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group M isolates by gag/env heteroduplex mobility assay. Study Group on Heterogeneity of HIV Epidemics in African Cities. J Virol, 74 (1). pp. 363-370.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

We developed a heteroduplex mobility assay in the gag gene (gag HMA) for the identification of group M subtypes A to H. The assay covers the region coding for amino acid 132 of p24 to amino acid 20 of p7 (according to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] ELI, 460 bp). The gag HMA was compared with sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of an evaluation panel of 79 HIV-1 group M isolates isolated from infected individuals from different geographic regions. Application of gag HMA in combination with env HMA on 252 HIV-1- positive plasma samples from Bénin, Cameroon, Kenya, and Zambia revealed a high prevalence of a variety of intersubtype recombinants in Yaoundé, Cameroon (53.8%); Kisumu, Kenya (26.8%); and Cotonou, Bénin (41%); no recombinants were identified among the samples from Ndola, Zambia. The AG(IbNG) circulating recombinant form, as determined by gag HMA, was found to be the most common intersubtype recombinant in Yaoundé (39.4%) and Cotonou (38.5%). Using a one-tube reverse transcriptase PCR protocol, this gag HMA in combination with env HMA is a useful tool for rapidly monitoring the prevalence of the various genetic subtypes as well as of recombinants of HIV-1. Moreover, this technology can easily be applied in laboratories in developing countries.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Heyndrickx, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Janssens, WUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zekeng, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Musonda, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Anagonou, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Van der Auwera, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Coppens, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Vereecken, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
De Witte, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Van Rampelbergh, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kahindo, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morison, Ll.morison@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
McCutchan, FEUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Carr, JKUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Albert, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Essex, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Goudsmit, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Asjö, BUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Salminen, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Buvé, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
van Der Groen, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : January 2000
Uncontrolled Keywords : Base Sequence, DNA Primers, Female, Genes, env, Genes, gag, HIV-1, Humans, Male, Nucleic Acid Heteroduplexes, Phylogeny, Recombination, Genetic
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:01
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:46
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/826082

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800