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Efficacy of plant essential oils against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria associated with ready-to-eat vegetables: antimicrobial and sensory screening.

Gutierrez, J, Rodriguez, G, Barry-Ryan, C and Bourke, P (2008) Efficacy of plant essential oils against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria associated with ready-to-eat vegetables: antimicrobial and sensory screening. J Food Prot, 71 (9). pp. 1846-1854.

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Abstract

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils (EOs) against foodborne pathogens and key spoilage bacteria pertinent to ready-to-eat vegetables and to screen the selected EOs for sensory acceptability. The EOs basil, caraway, fennel, lemon balm, marjoram, nutmeg, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, and thyme were evaluated. The bacteria evaluated were Listeria spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus spp., Bacillus cereus, Salmonella, Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas spp. Quantitative antimicrobial analyses were performed using an absorbance-based microplate assay. Efficacy was compared using MIC, the half maximum inhibitory concentration, and the increase in lag phase. Generally, gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to EOs than were gram-negative bacteria, and Listeria monocytogenes strains were among the most sensitive. Of the spoilage organisms, Pseudomonas spp. were the most resistant. Oregano and thyme EOs had the highest activity against all the tested bacteria. Marjoram and basil EOs had selectively high activity against B. cereus, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella, and lemon balm and sage EOs had adequate activity against L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. Within bacterial species, EO efficacy was dependent on strain and in some cases the origin of the strain. On a carrot model product, basil, lemon balm, marjoram, oregano, and thyme EOs were deemed organoleptically acceptable, but only oregano and marjoram EOs were deemed acceptable for lettuce. Selected EOs may be useful as natural and safe additives for promoting the safety and quality of ready-to-eat vegetables.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Gutierrez, Jj.gutierrez@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Rodriguez, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Barry-Ryan, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bourke, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : September 2008
Uncontrolled Keywords : Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacteria, Colony Count, Microbial, Consumer Product Safety, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Food Contamination, Food Microbiology, Humans, Mass Screening, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Oils, Volatile, Taste, Vegetables
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 10:00
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:46
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/826007

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