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Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is associated with reduced physical activity during everyday life.

Costa, M, Cropley, M, Griffith, J and Steptoe, A (1999) Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is associated with reduced physical activity during everyday life. Psychosom Med, 61 (6). pp. 806-811.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the impact on noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring on physical activity measured objectively by use of triaxial accelerometers. METHODS: Twenty-four working men and women performed ambulatory blood pressure plus activity monitoring for 1 working day and evening and activity monitoring alone for a separate day and evening. Blood pressure measures were taken at 20-minute intervals during the day and 30-minute intervals in the evening and were accompanied by diary assessments of mood, location, and posture. Comparisons were made of energy expenditure on the 2 days and of activity levels during the minutes surrounding each blood pressure reading and diary completion. RESULTS: Energy expenditure assessed in terms of activity calories per hour was significantly lower during blood pressure plus activity monitoring compared with activity monitoring alone (mean 37.3, SD = 16.3 vs. mean = 43.0, SD = 18.7 kcal, respectively: p = .02). Energy expenditure was lower during the 4 minutes surrounding each blood pressure reading than in the intervals between blood pressure readings. However, energy expenditure was also lower in the intervals between blood pressure readings than during comparable times on the activity only monitoring day. Blood pressure, heart rate, and physical activity were moderately correlated within individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Ambulatory blood pressure recording using automated sphygmomanometers is associated with reduced physical activity during the monitoring day. This is due partly to regular periods of immobility during cuff inflation and deflation and diary completion and partly to more general self-imposed restrictions on activity. This pattern has implications for the representativeness of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the construction of ambulatory monitoring diaries.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Costa, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cropley, Mmark.cropley@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Griffith, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Steptoe, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : November 1999
Uncontrolled Keywords : Adult, Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory, Confounding Factors (Epidemiology), Energy Metabolism, Faculty, Female, Humans, Male, Netherlands, Physical Exertion, Sampling Studies, Work
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 09:50
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:45
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/825319

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