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People don't exercise because they can't think of reasons to exercise: an examination of causal reasoning within the Transtheoretical Model.

Cropley, M, Ayers, S and Nokes, L (2003) People don't exercise because they can't think of reasons to exercise: an examination of causal reasoning within the Transtheoretical Model. Psychol Health Med, 8 (4). pp. 409-414.

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Abstract

This study compared the accessibility of the pros (advantages) and cons (disadvantages) of exercise in a group of non-exercisers and regular exercisers, using the Transtheoretical Model of behaviour change as a theoretical framework. Pre-contemplators (n = 18), and maintainers (n = 25), were asked to generate a list of 'advantages to taking part in exercise' (pro reasons), and a list of 'disadvantages to taking part in exercise' (con reasons). The time to generate their first item was recorded as well as the total number of items generated within 60 s. The results showed that pre-contemplators provided more con reasons relative to pro reasons; and maintainers provided more pro reasons relative to con reasons for exercise. Pre-contemplators were also quicker to provide their first con reason, relative to their first pro reason, but there was no difference in pro and con latencies in the maintainers. It was concluded that one reason pre-contemplation individuals do not participate in regular exercise may be because they cannot think of reasons to exercise.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Cropley, Mmark.cropley@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Ayers, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Nokes, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : November 2003
Identification Number : 10.1080/13548500310001604540
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 09:50
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:45
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/825308

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