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Self-treating hypoglycaemia: a longitudinal qualitative investigation of the experiences and views of people with Type 1 diabetes.

Lawton, J, Rankin, D, Cooke, DD, Elliott, J, Amiel, S, Heller, S and The UK NIHR DAFNE Study Group, (2012) Self-treating hypoglycaemia: a longitudinal qualitative investigation of the experiences and views of people with Type 1 diabetes. Diabet Med.

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Abstract

Aims:  Despite improvements in insulin therapy, hypoglycaemia remains an inevitable part of life for many people with Type 1 diabetes. Little attention has been paid to how individuals self-treat hypoglycaemia and their likes and dislikes of clinically recommended treatments. We explored participants' experiences of self-treating hypoglycaemia after attending a structured education programme for people with Type 1 diabetes. Our aims were: to identify treatments that are acceptable to people with Type 1 diabetes; and to provide recommendations for promoting self-treatment in line with clinical guidelines. Methods:  Thirty adults with Type 1 diabetes were recruited from the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme in the UK. Study participants were interviewed post-course and 6 and 12 months later, enabling their experiences to be explored over time. Results:  Study participants described a poor knowledge of how to self-treat hypoglycaemia correctly pre-course. Post-course, individuals often struggled to adhere to clinically recommended guidelines because of: panic, disorientation, hunger sensations and consequent difficulties ingesting fixed quantities of fast-acting carbohydrate; use of sweets to manage hypoglycaemia; reversion to habituated practices when cognitive impairment as a result of hypoglycaemia supervened; difficulties ingesting dextrose tablets; and other people's anxieties about under-treatment. Conclusions:  Historical experiences of hypoglycaemia and habituated practices can influence present self-treatment approaches. Professionals need to be aware of the range of difficulties individuals may experience restricting themselves to fixed quantities of fast-acting carbohydrate to manage hypoglycaemia. There may be merit in developing a more acceptable range of treatments tailored to people's own preferences, circumstances and needs. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Lawton, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rankin, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cooke, DDd.cooke@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Elliott, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Amiel, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Heller, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
The UK NIHR DAFNE Study Group, UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 4 September 2012
Identification Number : 10.1111/dme.12007
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 09:46
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:44
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/825060

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