University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Fimbriation and curliation in escherichia coli O157:H7 a paradigm of intestinal and environmental colonization

Lloyd, SJ, Torres, AG, Ritchie, JM, Torres, AG and Lloyd, SJ (2012) Fimbriation and curliation in escherichia coli O157:H7 a paradigm of intestinal and environmental colonization Gut Microbes, 3 (3). pp. 1-5.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes, particularly E. coli O157:H7, possess a variety of fimbrial and afimbrial adhesins which have emerged as important contributors to intestinal colonization. E. coli O157:H7 possesses two chromosomal operons encoding long polar fimbriae (Lpf), which have been found to influence adherence in vitro and colonization in vivo. In a recent Infection and Immunity paper, we further explored the role of Lpf in E. coli O157:H7 intestinal colonization by using the infant rabbit model of STEC infection. We found that an E. coli O157:H7 Lpf-deficient mutant was outcompeted in the rabbit intestine by its parental strain, which may suggest that Lpf contributes to colonization. In contrast, the Lpf-deficient mutant showed an increased adherence to cultured intestinal epithelial cells, and we discovered that this strain overexpressed curli fibers. In this addendum article, we provide a continued perspective on the predicted roles of Lpf and curli, both in vivo and in vitro. © 2012 Landes Bioscience.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Lloyd, SJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Torres, AGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ritchie, JMj.ritchie@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Torres, AGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lloyd, SJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : May 2012
Identification Number : 10.4161/gmic.20661
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 09:44
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:44
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/824901

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800