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Fecal carriage and shedding density of CTX-M extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase-producing escherichia coli in cattle, chickens, and pigs: implications for environmental contamination and food production.

Horton, RA, Randall, LP, Snary, EL, Cockrem, H, Lotz, S, Wearing, H, Duncan, D, Rabie, A, McLaren, I, Watson, E, La Ragione, RM and Coldham, NG (2011) Fecal carriage and shedding density of CTX-M extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase-producing escherichia coli in cattle, chickens, and pigs: implications for environmental contamination and food production. Appl Environ Microbiol, 77 (11). pp. 3715-3719.

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Abstract

The number and proportion of CTX-M positive Escherichia coli organisms were determined in feces from cattle, chickens, and pigs in the United Kingdom to provide a better understanding of the risk of the dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) bacteria to humans from food animal sources. Samples of bovine (n = 35) and swine (n = 20) feces were collected from farms, and chicken cecal contents (n = 32) were collected from abattoirs. There was wide variation in the number of CTX-M-positive E. coli organisms detected; the median (range) CFU/g were 100 (100 × 10(6) to 1 × 10(6)), 5,350 (100 × 10(6) to 3.1 × 10(6)), and 2,800 (100 × 10(5) to 4.7 × 10(5)) for cattle, chickens, and pigs, respectively. The percentages of E. coli isolates that were CTX-M positive also varied widely; median (range) values were 0.013% (0.001 to 1%) for cattle, 0.0197% (0.00001 to 28.18%) for chickens, and 0.121% (0.0002 to 5.88%) for pigs. The proportion of animals designated high-density shedders (≥1 × 10(4) CFU/g) of CTX-M E. coli was 3/35, 15/32, and 8/20 for cattle, chickens, and pigs, respectively. We postulate that high levels of CTX-M E. coli in feces facilitate the dissemination of bla(CTX-M) genes during the rearing of animals for food, and that the absolute numbers of CTX-M bacteria should be given greater consideration in epidemiological studies when assessing the risks of food-borne transmission.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Horton, RAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Randall, LPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Snary, ELUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cockrem, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lotz, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wearing, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Duncan, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rabie, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
McLaren, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Watson, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
La Ragione, RMr.laragione@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Coldham, NGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : June 2011
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02831-10
Uncontrolled Keywords : Animals, Bacterial Load, Bacterial Shedding, Cattle, Chickens, Environmental Microbiology, Escherichia coli, Feces, Food Microbiology, Great Britain, Humans, Swine, beta-Lactamases
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 09:30
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:43
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/823990

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