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Fecal carriage and shedding density of CTX-M extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase-producing escherichia coli in cattle, chickens, and pigs: implications for environmental contamination and food production.

Horton, RA, Randall, LP, Snary, EL, Cockrem, H, Lotz, S, Wearing, H, Duncan, D, Rabie, A, McLaren, I, Watson, E , La Ragione, RM and Coldham, NG (2011) Fecal carriage and shedding density of CTX-M extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase-producing escherichia coli in cattle, chickens, and pigs: implications for environmental contamination and food production. Appl Environ Microbiol, 77 (11). pp. 3715-3719.

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Abstract

The number and proportion of CTX-M positive Escherichia coli organisms were determined in feces from cattle, chickens, and pigs in the United Kingdom to provide a better understanding of the risk of the dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) bacteria to humans from food animal sources. Samples of bovine (n = 35) and swine (n = 20) feces were collected from farms, and chicken cecal contents (n = 32) were collected from abattoirs. There was wide variation in the number of CTX-M-positive E. coli organisms detected; the median (range) CFU/g were 100 (100 × 10(6) to 1 × 10(6)), 5,350 (100 × 10(6) to 3.1 × 10(6)), and 2,800 (100 × 10(5) to 4.7 × 10(5)) for cattle, chickens, and pigs, respectively. The percentages of E. coli isolates that were CTX-M positive also varied widely; median (range) values were 0.013% (0.001 to 1%) for cattle, 0.0197% (0.00001 to 28.18%) for chickens, and 0.121% (0.0002 to 5.88%) for pigs. The proportion of animals designated high-density shedders (≥1 × 10(4) CFU/g) of CTX-M E. coli was 3/35, 15/32, and 8/20 for cattle, chickens, and pigs, respectively. We postulate that high levels of CTX-M E. coli in feces facilitate the dissemination of bla(CTX-M) genes during the rearing of animals for food, and that the absolute numbers of CTX-M bacteria should be given greater consideration in epidemiological studies when assessing the risks of food-borne transmission.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Horton, RAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Randall, LPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Snary, ELUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cockrem, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lotz, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wearing, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Duncan, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rabie, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
McLaren, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Watson, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
La Ragione, RMr.laragione@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Coldham, NGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : June 2011
Identification Number : 10.1128/AEM.02831-10
Uncontrolled Keywords : Animals, Bacterial Load, Bacterial Shedding, Cattle, Chickens, Environmental Microbiology, Escherichia coli, Feces, Food Microbiology, Great Britain, Humans, Swine, beta-Lactamases
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 09:30
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:43
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/823990

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