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Anxiety, depression and self-esteem in secondary school children - An investigation into the impact of standard assessment tests (SATs) and other important school examinations

Locker, J and Cropley, M (2004) Anxiety, depression and self-esteem in secondary school children - An investigation into the impact of standard assessment tests (SATs) and other important school examinations School Psychology International, 25 (3). pp. 333-345.

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Abstract

With the introduction of a new curriculum and increased targets for schools, children are facing increased pressure to succeed in examinations at increasingly earlier ages. It is therefore necessary to emphasize the need for greater awareness of the distress that may be experienced by young children and adolescents as a result and implement provision for early interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate changes occurring in anxiety, affect, depression and self-esteem in secondary school children as they approached important school examinations and to examine variations between schools of differing design and status. There were a total of 520 participants, from four different schools in two school years (year 9, age 13-14 and year 11, age 15-16). Participants completed self-report questionnaires at two time points - firstly during regular term time and the second in the week immediately prior to the examinations. Gender differences were found in the majority of measures with females displaying greater levels of anxiety and negative affect immediately before the examinations, whereas males reported higher positive affect and self-esteem and lower depression and anxiety, even within the week prior to the examinations. Differences between the schools were also found. However, there were no significant differences between the two school years and the two times of testing. A number of trends were identified in relation to both gender differences and the influence of the type of school attended. Females, particularly those attending independent or grammar schools, reported a greater negative mood overall and before the examinations. It is suggested that there is a need for a school-based provision aimed at pro-actively increasing pupils self-esteem and to develop skills for dealing with stressful, situations particularly important examinations.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Locker, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cropley, Mmark.cropley@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2004
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1177/0143034304046905
Uncontrolled Keywords : GENDER-DIFFERENCES CHILDHOOD DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS ADOLESCENTS INVENTORY MODEL
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 May 2017 09:08
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:40
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/822440

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