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I Think, Therefore I Invent: Creative Computers and the Future of Patent Law

Abbott, R (2016) I Think, Therefore I Invent: Creative Computers and the Future of Patent Law Boston College Law Review, 57 (4). pp. 1079-1126.

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Abstract

Artificial intelligence has been generating inventive output for decades, and now the continued and exponential growth in computing power is poised to take creative machines from novelties to major drivers of economic growth. In some cases, a computer’s output constitutes patentable subject matter, and the computer rather than a person meets the requirements for inventorship. Despite this, and despite the fact that the Patent Office has already granted patents for inventions by computers, the issue of computer inventorship has never been explicitly considered by the courts, Congress, or the Patent Office. Drawing on dynamic principles of statutory interpretation and taking analogies from the copyright context, this Article argues that creative computers should be considered inventors under the Patent and Copyright Clause of the Constitution. Treating nonhumans as inventors would incentivize the creation of intellectual property by encouraging the development of creative computers. This Article also addresses a host of challenges that would result from computer inventorship, including the ownership of computer-based inventions, the displacement of human inventors, and the need for consumer protection policies. This analysis applies broadly to nonhuman creators of intellectual property, and explains why the Copyright Office came to the wrong conclusion with its Human Authorship Requirement. Finally, this Article addresses how computer inventorship provides insight into other areas of patent law. For instance, computers could replace the hypothetical skilled person that courts use to judge inventiveness. Creative computers may require a rethinking of the baseline standard for inventiveness, and potentially of the entire patent system.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Law
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Abbott, Rr.abbott@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 September 2016
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016, Ryan Abbott. All rights reserved
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 16 May 2017 15:37
Last Modified : 18 May 2017 13:13
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/820928

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