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Influence of co-payment levels on patient and surgeon acceptance of advanced technology intraocular lenses.

Carones, F, Knorz, MC, Jackson, D and Samiian, A (2014) Influence of co-payment levels on patient and surgeon acceptance of advanced technology intraocular lenses. J Refract Surg, 30 (4). pp. 278-281.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate patients' willingness to pay for advanced technology intraocular lenses and surgeons' willingness to recommend them. METHODS: In this study, 370 cataract surgeons and 700 patients undergoing cataract surgery from seven countries underwent online interviews in which they were shown unbranded profiles of three advanced technology intraocular lenses (ie, biconvex toric aspheric optic, symmetric biconvex diffractive optic, and biconvex diffractive aspheric toric) and asked to indicate their willingness to accept (for patients) or suggest (for surgeons) each lens. Acceptance was assessed assuming there was either no co-payment or co-payments of €500 to €1,500 +15%. RESULTS: All three lenses were widely accepted by patients, with 68% to 99% indicating acceptance when there was no co-payment. In contrast, surgeons' willingness to suggest them was markedly lower (20% to 43%). Both patients' acceptance of the lenses and surgeons' willingness to suggest them decreased with increasing co-payment levels to 19% to 74% (patients) and 5% to 31% (surgeons) at the highest co-payment levels. CONCLUSIONS: There is a marked discrepancy between patients' acceptance of the three lenses and surgeons' willingness to suggest them. Although patients' acceptance is high, it decreases with increasing out-of-pocket expenditure. Manufacturers should communicate the relative benefits and costs of their lenses to both surgeons and patients.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Carones, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Knorz, MCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jackson, Dd.jackson@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Samiian, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : April 2014
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.3928/1081597X-20140320-07
Uncontrolled Keywords : Cataract Extraction, Financing, Personal, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, Lens Implantation, Intraocular, Lenses, Intraocular, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Prosthesis Design
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 16 May 2017 15:29
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:35
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/820035

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