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Predicting jet lag in long-haul cabin crew: The role of illness cognitions and behaviour

Ruscitto, Cristina and Ogden, Jane (2017) Predicting jet lag in long-haul cabin crew: The role of illness cognitions and behaviour Psychology and Health: an international journal.

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Abstract

Objective: Established risk factors for jet lag are mostly physiological including circadian preference, age, gender, the number of flight zones crossed and to some extent direction of travel. Some research has also highlighted a role for psychosocial factors including sleep, diet and ‘circadian’ health behaviours and illness cognitions although this remains relatively untested. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of sleep, diet and illness cognitions in predicting perceived jet lag amongst long-haul crew. Design: 60 long-haul crew took part in a longitudinal study. Profile characteristics (including chronotype), preparation strategies (sleep, eating and ‘circadian’ behaviours) and illness cognitions were measured at baseline (before a trip). Main outcome measures: Subjective jet lag (unidimensional and multidimensional) was measured on the crews’ second day off (post-trip). Results: Hierarchical regression analyses showed that unidimensional jet lag was predicted by the belief in a cyclical timeline whereas multidimensional jet lag was predicted by multidimensional jet lag at baseline and to a lesser extent by identity. No role was found for profile characteristics and preparation strategies. Conclusion: Illness cognitions partly explain the experience of perceived jet lag in long-haul cabin crew indicating that jet lag is in part a psycho-social construct, not just a biological one.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Psychology
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Ruscitto, CristinaC.Ruscitto@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Ogden, JaneJ.Ogden@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 18 April 2017
Identification Number : 10.1080/08870446.2017.1314481
Copyright Disclaimer : This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology and Health, on 18 April 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/08870446.2017.1314481
Uncontrolled Keywords : Long-haul cabin crew; jet lag; sleep strategies; eating strategies; circadian preference; illness cognitions
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 05 May 2017 14:43
Last Modified : 12 Jul 2017 12:44
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/814116

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