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Trends of People Using Drugs and Opioid Substitute Treatment Recorded in England and Wales General Practice (1994-2012)

Davies, H, Nazareth, I and Petersen, I (2015) Trends of People Using Drugs and Opioid Substitute Treatment Recorded in England and Wales General Practice (1994-2012) PLoS One.

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Abstract

Background Illicit drug use is a multifaceted public-health problem with potentially serious impacts. The United Kingdom has one of the highest prevalence of illegal drug use in Europe. Reduction of overall illegal drug use in England and Wales has decreased from 11% to 8.2% (2012/13) over the past 10 years. People who use drugs often seek help from their family doctors. Aims To investigate General Practitioners (family doctors) first recording of drug use and opioid substitute treatment in primary care settings. Design A descriptive study design. Males and females (16-64 years old) were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. Setting England and Wales primary care. Method The first recording of drug use and opioid substitution treatment in primary care was estimated for the period (1994-2012). Poisson regressions were conducted to estimate incidence risk ratios (IRR). Results We identified 33,508 first recordings of drug use and 10,869 individuals with prescriptions for opioid substitute treatment. Overall, males (IRR 2.02, 95% CI:1.97–2.07), people in the age-group; 16-24 (IRR 6.7, 95% CI:6.4–6.9) compared to those over 25 years and the most deprived (IRR 4.2, 95% CI:3.9–4.4) were more likely to have a recording of drug use. Males (IRR 1.2 95% CI:1.2–1.3), in the age-group; 25-34 (IRR 1.8 95% CI:1.7–1.9) and the most deprived (IRR 3.9 95% CI:3.6–4.3) were the groups more likely to have a opioid substitute treatment prescription. Conclusion It is evident from this study that there is little recording of drug use and opioid substitute treatment in primary care. Most drug users do not receive treatment in primary care.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Health Care
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Davies, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Nazareth, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Petersen, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 29 April 2015
Identification Number : 10.1371/journal.pone.0122626
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2015 Davies et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Apr 2017 10:48
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 19:19
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/814063

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