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Chicken juice enhances surface attachment and biofilm formation of Campylobacter jejuni

Brown, HL, Reuter, M, Salt, LJ, Cross, KL, Betts, RP and van Vliet, AH (2014) Chicken juice enhances surface attachment and biofilm formation of Campylobacter jejuni Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 80 (22). pp. 7053-7060.

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Abstract

The bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is primarily transmitted via the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs, especially poultry meat. In food processing environments, C. jejuni is required to survive a multitude of stresses and requires the use of specific survival mechanisms, such as biofilms. An initial step in biofilm formation is bacterial attachment to a surface. Here, we investigated the effects of a chicken meat exudate (chicken juice) on C. jejuni surface attachment and biofilm formation. Supplementation of brucella broth with ≥5% chicken juice resulted in increased biofilm formation on glass, polystyrene, and stainless steel surfaces with four C. jejuni isolates and one C. coli isolate in both microaerobic and aerobic conditions. When incubated with chicken juice, C. jejuni was both able to grow and form biofilms in static cultures in aerobic conditions. Electron microscopy showed that C. jejuni cells were associated with chicken juice particulates attached to the abiotic surface rather than the surface itself. This suggests that chicken juice contributes to C. jejuni biofilm formation by covering and conditioning the abiotic surface and is a source of nutrients. Chicken juice was able to complement the reduction in biofilm formation of an aflagellated mutant of C. jejuni, indicating that chicken juice may support food chain transmission of isolates with lowered motility. We provide here a useful model for studying the interaction of C. jejuni biofilms in food chain-relevant conditions and also show a possible mechanism for C. jejuni cell attachment and biofilm initiation on abiotic surfaces within the food chain.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Veterinary Medicine
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Brown, HLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Reuter, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Salt, LJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cross, KLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Betts, RPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
van Vliet, AHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 5 September 2014
Identification Number : 10.1128/AEM.02614-14
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright © 2014 Brown et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 27 Jun 2017 14:46
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 19:15
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813929

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