University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

The electric commons: a qualitative study of community accountability

Melville, Emilia, Christie, Ian, Burningham, Katherine, Way, C and Hampshire, P (2017) The electric commons: a qualitative study of community accountability Energy Policy, 106. pp. 12-21.

[img]
Preview
Text
1-s2.0-S0301421517301799-main.pdf - Version of Record

Download (514kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview
[img] Text
The Electric Commons - manuscript.docx - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (122kB)

Abstract

This study explores how energy might be conceptualised as a commons, a resource owned and managed by a community with a system of rules for production and consumption. It tests one aspect of Elinor Ostrom’s design principles for successful management of common pool resources: that there should be community accountability for individual consumption behaviour. This is explored through interviews with participants in a community demand response (DR) trial in an urban neighbourhood in the UK. Domestic DR can make a contribution to balancing electricity supply and demand. This relies on smart meters, which raise vertical (individual to large organisation) privacy concerns. Community and local approaches could motivate greater levels of DR than price signals alone. We found that acting as part of a community is motivating, a conclusion which supports local and community based roll out of smart meters. Mutually supportive, voluntary, and anonymous sharing of information was welcomed. However, mutual monitoring was seen as an invasion of horizontal (peer to peer) privacy. We conclude that the research agenda, which asks whether local commons-based governance of electricity systems could provide social and environmental benefits, is worth pursuing further. This needs a shift in regulatory barriers and ‘governance-system neutral’ innovation funding.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Sociology
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Department of Sociology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Melville, Emiliaemilia.melville@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Christie, IanI.Christie@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Burningham, KatherineK.Burningham@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Way, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hampshire, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 21 March 2017
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.03.035
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/)
Uncontrolled Keywords : Community infrastructure Demand Response Energy commons Privacy Smart meters Surveillance
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 22 Mar 2017 15:19
Last Modified : 19 Jul 2017 13:32
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813825

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800