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Therapeutic potential and ownership of commercially available consoles in children with cerebral palsy

Farr, W, Green, D, Male, I, Morris, C, Bailey, S, Gage, Heather, Speller, S, Colville, V, Jackson, M, Bremner, S and Memon, A (2017) Therapeutic potential and ownership of commercially available consoles in children with cerebral palsy British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 80 (2). pp. 108-116.

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Abstract

Introduction: We conducted a survey amongst families of children with cerebral palsy to ascertain the ownership and therapeutic use and potential of commercial games consoles to improve motor function. Method: Three hundred families in South East England were identified through clinical records, and were requested to complete an anonymised questionnaire. Results: A total of 61 families (20% response) returned a completed questionnaire with 41 (68%) identified males and 19 (32%) identified females with cerebral palsy, with a mean age of 11 years 5 months (SD 3Y 7M). The large majority of families, 59 (97%), owned a commercial console and the child used this for 50–300 minutes a week. Returns by severity of motor impairment were: Gross Motor Function Classification System I (22%), II (32%), III (13%), IV (15%), V (18%). Consoles were used regularly for play across all Gross Motor Function Classification System categories. Conclusion: The potential of games consoles, as home-based virtual reality therapy, in improving the motor function of children with cerebral palsy should be appropriately tested in a randomised controlled trial. Wide ownership, and the relative ease with which children engage in the use of commercially-based virtual reality therapy systems, suggests potential as a means of augmenting therapy protocols, taking advantage of interest and participation patterns of families.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Economics
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Economics
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Farr, WUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Green, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Male, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morris, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bailey, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gage, HeatherH.Gage@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Speller, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Colville, VUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jackson, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bremner, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Memon, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2017
Identification Number : 10.1177/0308022616678635
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright The Author(s) 2017. Published by Sage.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Cerebral palsy, commercial consoles, survey, assistive technology
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Feb 2017 13:46
Last Modified : 19 Jul 2017 10:57
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813642

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