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Recordings as Learning and Practising Resources for Performance: Exploring Attitudes and Behaviours of Music Students and Professionals

Volioti, Georgia and Williamon, A (2016) Recordings as Learning and Practising Resources for Performance: Exploring Attitudes and Behaviours of Music Students and Professionals Musicae Scientiae: the journal of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music.

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Abstract

This article examines how musicians use recordings as learning resources in preparing for performance. While previous research has partially acknowledged the contribution of external factors to self-regulated learning, the specific impact of recordings on performers’ approaches to practising remains largely uncharted. A survey was designed to assess the use and importance of recordings on musicians’ listening and practising behaviours, their preferences when choosing recordings, and the type of influence exerted by recordings over self-regulatory processes. Respondents (N = 204) completed an online survey, and the data were analysed according to level of expertise: advanced music students (n = 147) and professional musicians (n = 57). The results show clear differences between students and professionals in the frequency of use and level of reliance on recordings, with students consistently exhibiting a greater preference for these resources. Students were more likely to listen to recordings and, consequently, change aspects of their interpretations in the early stages of practising. Additionally, students were influenced by other people’s recommendations, especially their teachers’, and by other performers’ reputations when choosing recordings. The need to develop a distinct style had a positive influence on students’ practising and performing habits. The study shows that listening to recordings forms an integral part of selfregulated learning activities and contributes to musicians’ development by increasing musical knowledge and stylistic awareness.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Music and Media
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Arts > Music
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Volioti, Georgiag.volioti@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Williamon, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 21 October 2016
Identification Number : 10.1177/1029864916674048
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2016 Sage Publications
Uncontrolled Keywords : expertise, listening preferences, musical performance, practice, recordings
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 22 Feb 2017 17:21
Last Modified : 12 Sep 2017 17:54
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813609

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