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The Association between Work-Related Rumination and Heart Rate Variability: A Field Study

Cropley, M, Plans, David, Morelli, Davide, Sütterlin, S, Inceoglu, Ilke, Thomas, Geoff and Chu, Chris Wai Lung (2017) The Association between Work-Related Rumination and Heart Rate Variability: A Field Study Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11, 27.

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the association between perseverative cognition in the form of work-related rumination, and heart rate variability (HRV). We tested the hypothesis that high ruminators would show lower vagally mediated HRV relative to low ruminators during their leisure time. Individuals were classified as being low (n = 17) or high ruminators (n = 19), using the affective scale on the work-related rumination measure. HRV was assessed using a wrist sensor band (Microsoft Band 2). HRV was sampled between 8 pm and 10 pm over three workday evenings (Monday to Wednesday) while individuals carried out their normal evening routines. Compared to the low ruminators, high affective ruminators demonstrated lower HRV in the form of root mean square successive differences (RMSSDs), relative to the low ruminators, indicating lower parasympathetic activity. There was no significant difference in heart rate, or activity levels between the two groups during the recording periods. The current findings of this study may have implications for the design and delivery of interventions to help individuals unwind post work and to manage stress more effectively. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Psychology
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Cropley, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Plans, Davidd.plans@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Morelli, Davided.morelli@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Sütterlin, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Inceoglu, Ilkei.inceoglu@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Thomas, Geoffgeoff.thomas@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Chu, Chris Wai Lungc.chu@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 31 January 2017
Identification Number : 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00027
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright ©2017 Cropley, Plans, Morelli, Sütterlin, Inceoglu, Thomas and Chu. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CCBY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s)or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Uncontrolled Keywords : work-related rumination, heart rate variability, unwinding from work, recovery
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 01 Feb 2017 16:10
Last Modified : 08 Aug 2017 10:51
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813430

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