University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Public preferences for GP consultation for perceived cancer risk: a discrete choice experiment.

Whitaker, Katriina, Ghanouni, A, Zhou, Y, Lyratzopoulos, G and Morris, S (2017) Public preferences for GP consultation for perceived cancer risk: a discrete choice experiment. British Journal of General Practice.

[img] Text
Public preferences for GP consultation according to cancer risknoFC_R1final.docx - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (58kB)
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Contacting a doctor for advice when experiencing a potential cancer symptom is an important step in earlier diagnosis, but barriers to consultation are commonly reported. Aim: To investigate patients’ GP consultation preferences when presented with a potential cancer symptom, and to describe whether these preferences are mediated by variable levels of cancer risk. Design and setting: UK-wide online survey of adults over 50 years old, using quota sampling to reflect general population characteristics. Method: A discrete choice experiment examined preferences for primary care consultation for three cancer symptom scenarios (risk level not mentioned, risk designated as either “low” or “high”). Scenarios based on length of consultation, time to getting an appointment, convenience, choice of GP and GP listening skills were presented in a self-completed online questionnaire. Results: We obtained 9616 observations from 601 participants. Participants expressed preferences for doctors with better listening skills, for ability to see a GP of their choice and for shorter waiting times. These findings were the same across risk conditions and demographic groups. Participants were willing to wait an extra 3.5 weeks for an appointment with a doctor with good/very good listening skills (vs very poor listening skills) and an extra 1 week for an appointment with a GP of their choice (vs any GP). Conclusion: Patient decisions about help-seeking seem to be particularly influenced by the anticipated listening skills of doctors. Improving doctor’s communication skills may in the longer term encourage people to seek prompt medical help when they experience a cancer symptom.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Health Sciences
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Whitaker, Katriinak.whitaker@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Ghanouni, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zhou, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lyratzopoulos, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morris, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 25 July 2017
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2017 Royal College of General Practitioners
Uncontrolled Keywords : cancer, primary health care, symptoms, decision making, heath services research.
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 25 Jan 2017 17:08
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 19:04
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813367

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800