University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Predictors of emotional exhaustion, disengagement and burnout among improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT) practitioners

Westwood, Susan, Morison, Linda, Allt, J and Holmes, Nan (2017) Predictors of emotional exhaustion, disengagement and burnout among improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT) practitioners Journal of Mental Health, 26 (2). pp. 172-179.

[img] Text
Burnout paper for SRI.docx - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 13 January 2018.
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (49kB)
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Among mental health staff, burnout has been associated with undesirable outcomes, such as physical and mental ill-health, high levels of staff turnover and poorer patient care. Aims: To estimate the prevalence and predictors of burnout amongst Improving Access to Psychological Therapist (IAPT) practitioners. Methods: IAPT practitioners (N = 201) completed an on-line survey measuring time spent per week on different types of work related activity. These were investigated as predictors of burnout (measured using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory). Results: The prevalence of burnout was 68.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 58.8–77.3%) among psychological wellbeing practitioners (PWP) and 50.0% (95% CI 39.6–60.4%) among high intensity (HI) therapists. Among PWPs hours of overtime-predicted higher odds of burnout and hours of clinical supervision predicted lower odds of burnout. The odds of burnout increased with telephone hours of patient contact among PWPs who had worked in the service for two or more years. None of the job characteristics significantly predicted burnout among HI therapists. Conclusions: Our results suggest a high prevalence of burnout among IAPT practitioners. Strategies to reduce burnout among PWPs involving reductions in workload, particularly telephone contact and increases in clinical supervision need to be evaluated.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Psychology
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Westwood, Susansue.westwood@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Morison, LindaL.Morison@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Allt, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Holmes, NanN.Holmes@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 13 January 2017
Identification Number : 10.1080/09638237.2016.1276540
Copyright Disclaimer : This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Mental Health on 13 Jan 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09638237.2016.1276540
Uncontrolled Keywords : Burnout, emotional exhaustion, disengagement, IAPT, mental health
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 18 Jan 2017 09:18
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 19:03
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813316

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800