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Effects of physical activity at work and life-style on sleep in workers from an Amazonian Extractivist Reserve

Martins, AJ, Vasconcelos, SP, Skene, Debra, Lowden, A and de Castro Moreno, CR (2016) Effects of physical activity at work and life-style on sleep in workers from an Amazonian Extractivist Reserve Sleep Science, 9. pp. 289-294.

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Abstract

Physical activity has been recommended as a strategy for improving sleep. Nevertheless, physical effort at work might not be not the ideal type of activity to promote sleep quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of type of job (low vs. high physical effort) and life-style on sleep of workers from an Amazonian Extractivist Reserve, Brazil. A cross-sectional study of 148 low physical activity (factory workers) and 340 high physical activity (rubber tappers) was conducted between September and November 2011. The workers filled out questionnaires collecting data on demographics (sex, age, occupation, marital status and children), health (reported morbidities, sleep disturbances, musculoskeletal pain and body mass index) and life-style (smoking, alcohol use and practice of leisure-time physical activity). Logistic regression models were applied with the presence of sleep disturbances as the primary outcome variable. The prevalence of sleep disturbances among factory workers and rubber tappers was 15.5% and 27.9%, respectively. The following independent variables of the analysis were selected based on a univariate model (p<0.20): sex, age, marital status, work type, smoking, morbidities and musculoskeletal pain. The predictors for sleep disturbances were type of job (high physical effort); sex (female); age (>40 years), and having musculoskeletal pain (≥5 symptoms). Rubber tapper work, owing to greater physical effort, pain and musculoskeletal fatigue, was associated with sleep disturbances. Being female and older than 40 years were also predictors of poor sleep. In short, these findings suggest that demanding physical exertion at work may not improve sleep quality.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Biosciences and Medicine
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Martins, AJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Vasconcelos, SPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Skene, DebraD.Skene@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Lowden, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
de Castro Moreno, CRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 19 October 2016
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.slsci.2016.10.001
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 Brazilian Association of Sleep. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords : Sleep disturbances; Work; Life style; Musculoskeletal pain; Physical activity
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 06 Jan 2017 15:12
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 19:02
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813223

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